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Posts tagged race.

Free PDFs by native authors!

blackfeministmanifesto:

this-is-not-native:

So while combing through the interwebs for .pdf books on unrelated subjects, I happened upon zinelibrary.info- an anarchist collective dedicated to the free distribution of radical literature. They have a lot of titles by authors mentioned in this post, as well as many others covering relevant topics. Here are a few that I think may be of interest:

Of course, there’s an entire “indigenous” section of the site (not limited to North America!) as well as a section on race. Happy reading! Time to check some books off my reading list!

-Kirby

POC Solidarity!

11.30.12 ♥ 4604
10.04.12 ♥ 1153

mehreenkasana:

haiderz:

‘Each of these cultural change-makers has nudged the nation forward, and while they may be only a few out of legions of unsung heroes, this makes them no less heroic.’ VOGUE salutes eight Pakistani women for breaking stereotypes with their resilience and ‘true grit.’

Vogue India features Pakistani women doing things. Bravo!

I love this.

And I love this even more considering how all of them are in Pakistan at the moment working on issues pertinent to the country. Meesha Shafi is a well-known figure in the entertainment industry (listen to her sing in Coke Studio), Zeb and Haniya have won Pakistan’s collective heart with their innovative music style in Urdu, Pashto and Farsi (listen to them here), Sherbano Taseer is the daughter of the assassinated Salman Taseer and continues to speak bravely about human rights issues in Pakistan, Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy remains a prominent voice on women rights issues in Pakistan and has fearlessly documented Taliban tactics in the region, Sarah Belal is a human rights activist and lawyer, Aysha Raja is a great entrepreneur and radio jockey, Huma Mulji remains ever efficient with her artistic prowess over design who once correctly said: “Pakistan puts no restrictions on me, no more than anywhere else. Every country has its own censorship. Here, it is self-imposed.” Saba Gul is a social activist and architect and works in rural areas with young women for economic and social change.

And the best part? There are thousands, not documented in this issue, just like them waiting to share their success story and contribution to Pakistan as Pakistani women.

09.09.12 ♥ 1045

I don’t really get too down on white people about white guilt

queerbrownxx:

I guess I can empathize cause I grew up middle to upper-middle class in a country that’s ENTRENCHED with class privilege, but my parents grew up poor and took us to church (where all my social activity occurred, outside of school) in one of the very poorest areas in the country and I honestly think I was traumatized when I became aware of the disparity between myself and the people from that community (and I’m not trivializing trauma, I’m a survivor of rape and abuse and I wouldn’t do that). I’m talking about things like seeing little kids who literally didn’t have a shirt to put on their backs. Who had to beg on the streets or they were *not* going to get anything to eat that day. That shit is horrifying to see when you know you have a maid and a gardener and you don’t have to worry about getting shot at literally any moment.

You just feel SO guilty at having SO much privilege and you didn’t even ask for it and you don’t know what to do because you want to give some of it away but you don’t know how. 

And to bring it full circle, I think this is the same kind of place that we get our well-meaning white saviors from. I know, I get it. You just want to help. Well, potential white saviors (and especially activist types), in an effort to help you help yourselves, here are some friendly tips:

1. Learn how to see POC as fully human. 

And if you even just *acknowledge* that you’re privileged to POC, you will blow many a mind. I’ll warn you though, this is the hardest part, because the guilt you’re going to feel when realized you hadn’t really, truly considered them as totally human in the first place is going to threaten to send you right back to the beginning. Don’t let that happen! When it pops up, just take some time to feel it and let it pass.

2. Always be willing to take the L in discussions about race.

It doesn’t matter if you’re actually right. If you can’t convince them of that in a way that doesn’t make them sad or angry, let it go. Not causing trauma is more important than being right.

3. Cool it with the pity.

Yeah, a lot of shit sucks but most of us are pretty happy with our lives and our cultures. We just want the privilege-induced dysfunction gone.

4. Be very, very careful with your speech.

There are a LOT of ignorant things that we have to hear day in, day out. Most of them aren’t intentionally mean, but more of them are mean than you realize, and anyway it all just still gets so old and draining. Just keep race-related thoughts to yourself until you’re *sure* the person they’re directed at won’t be offended. If they get offended anyway, see point #2.

5. If some POC allows you access to some part of their culture, you are allowed access with *them* in particular.

Don’t go borrowing from other cultures all willy-nilly just cause you have a friend/lover/child who is this or that ethnicity. Those people might know you’re really a good person, but other POC don’t and it just comes across as oppressive.

6. [Updated point]: You have to help other white people be less ignorant.

Especially the ones who you know “don’t really mean it”. If you care about them, you are doing both them and us a BIG favour by educating them.

That’s all I can think about for now. I might update this post later.

I love this. I’ve always had such a hard time with white guilt, especially as a white-passing biracial person. There have been so many times that I have declared “I fucking hate white people!” after reading about racism and general ignorance, then looked in the mirror and felt like scraping my skin off. Sometimes I find myself wishing I wasn’t white, but then I realize that that’s probably the most privileged thing I could possibly think, and then my guilt grows. It’s been a really rough battle for me, and I feel like reminders like this of how destructive white guilt is to progress help me tremendously. 

06.28.12 ♥ 203

fromonesurvivortoanother:

You should not read the comments, because they are predictably chock full of racist people.

06.17.12 ♥ 9
video

sonicbrew:

Awesome documentary by a group of women of colour discussing shadeism within several cultures.

severelycalm:

lesbianseparatist:

There’s nobody to be. No me to be…not in bed anyway.

‘La Ofrenda,’ Moraga. 1991.

I need this book!

tranqualizer:

ubleproject:

Featured Interview:

Jewel Thais-Williams, 72

Text reads, “Jewel Thais-Williams, age 72, is the founder and owner of the Catch One Disco, the oldest continuously running black gay nightclub in the United States. She also runs Village Health Foundation, where she is a licensed acupuncturist. Born in Gary, IN and raised in San Diego, she moved to Los Angeles at 18 to attend school’ she worked in various retail jobs before opening the Catch One in 1973. The Catch One has served as community space for black gay Los Angeles, providing a home for Unity Fellowship Church, ULOAH, Christopher Street West, Minority AIDS project as well as AA and CA support meetings. She lives in Los Angeles.”

People of color, women, and gays — who now have greater access to the centers of influence than ever before — are under pressure to be well-behaved when talking about their struggles. There is an expectation that we can talk about sins but no one must be identified as a sinner: newspapers love to describe words or deeds as “racially charged” even in those cases when it would be more honest to say “racist”; we agree that there is rampant misogyny, but misogynists are nowhere to be found; homophobia is a problem but no one is homophobic. One cumulative effect of this policed language is that when someone dares to point out something as obvious as white privilege, it is seen as unduly provocative. Marginalized voices in America have fewer and fewer avenues to speak plainly about what they suffer; the effect of this enforced civility is that those voices are falsified or blocked entirely from the discourse.

— Excerpt from Teju Cole’s essay “The White Savior Industrial Complex”.
(via jalwhite)

03.22.12 ♥ 6352

my-journey-my-thoughts:

[TW: Talk of sexual assault, physical assault, violence and antiziganism.]

I’ve sat here, combating the ignorance individually. I’m done with that. I’m done trying to reach you on a one on one level. You continuously ignore anything from me, you ignore the people I talk to on here who are Roma. You say we’re “Being too sensitive,” that “Gypsy is just a word,” that it stands for “Being free spirited, moving from place to place,” and the best, “I’m APPRECIATING your culture.”

First, gypsy is a slur. No matter what you think, it has been a slur for centuries.  It’s where the term “gypped” comes from. It was believed that the Roma would rip gadje (non-Roma) off for money. Roma who escaped the fate of death at the hands of the SS and their dogs, the ones who weren’t killed right away, were branded with a “Z”, which stood for Zigeuner, the German word for “Gypsy”. They were shipped to death camps, where barely any suvived.

It is a slur still used today. Roma are called “Gyppos” while being beaten, forced out of their settlements, forced to move. They are called this when they are assaulted and even raped. They are victims of forced sterilization, forcible eviction of settlements, harassment by both law enforcement and citizens, fingerprinting simply because they are Roma, they are often ecxluded from schools.

I want you to look at this:

image

This is from 2009. This is a Roma woman being assaulted WHILE CARRYING HER CHILD in Dublin! This is what the word “Gypsy” stands for.

This is Natalka Kudrikova. She is a little girl who was severely burned when antiziganists threw molotov cocktails into her family’s home:

image

This is also what the word “Gypsy” stands for. This happened in 2010. Systemic violence against a culture, an ethnicity, that just wants to be treated equally, to not have their way of life treated horribly. You can be sure, as these acts were going on, the word “GYPSY!” was being screamed in a way meant to incite fear and terror in those hearing it.

You dress up in flowy clothing, half-naked or naked except for a shawl. Do you have any idea how insulting that is? It contributes to the fetishization and sexualization of the Roma. Women are assaulted physically and sexually, because of this type of thing. They are raped, simply because they are believed to be “Easy” because of these “Positive stereotypes” you’re so quick to buy into.

It’s damaging to the culture when you treat it as a costume. Do you know the meaning behind the long skirts, or the “head scarves” that you’re so fond of donning? Do you know why the Roma wear these? It’s not for fucking fashion.

When you wear these things without a a care, you take away the meaning of these items. You take away the deep cultural roots the have. The skirt is worn because the lower half of the body is traditionally seen as “unclean” due to marime, or the code that’s followed. That “scarf” is known as a diklo, worn by women when they are married.

When you dress like this, you are spitting in the face of that culture, these people that are treated like they’re less than garbage TODAY. Not centuries ago, this is STILL HAPPENING

So, before you tag that picture as “Gypsy” or say you want to “Lead a gypsy lifestyle,” look back on this post. Think about what that word means, and what you’re saying. Think about how fucking disrespectful it is. Think about the racism involved with that word. And realize that you are contributing to the ignorance that allows violence like these 2 out of countless incidents that occur. You are turning the Roma into a trope. This positive stereotype allows people to ignore the violence and hatred that Roma are still facing, because everyone thinks that being a “gypsy” is all about freedom, when really, they face oppression daily!

You’re not cool when you do this, you’re contributing to racism and violence.

All the awards. 

03.09.12 ♥ 10212

If you say something ridiculous or offensive and people call you out, do yourself a favor and don’t try to hide behind the “I’m ignorant! I didn’t know! You need to teach me!” argument. Because here’s how it is…

  • If you don’t know what you’re talking about (as in, you honestly have no experience or research invested in your argument) you should not be talking. In order to participate in intelligent conversations, you need to have some knowledge backing you up: not assumptions or opinions. For example, you shouldn’t argue about what’s sexist or not without first knowing what sexism is and how it affects different people in different ways. 
  • It is no one else’s job to educate you. If you’re an ally for the GSM community, do some research on your own first. If you are a white person discussing race issues, read a book or two on the issue you’re addressing before you join the conversation. Some people are nice enough to point out the flaws in your arguments in an educational manner, but it’s in no way their responsibility to tell you everything there is to know. You have to carry your own scholarly weight. There is no excuse for saying sexist, racist, ableist, heterosexist, cissexist, or classist things, not even ignorance. If we made excuses for these types of things, we’d be opening up the door to more problematic and harmful behavior or speech under the protection of ‘ignorance.’ 
  • Never assume you understand a point of view that’s not your own. You can familiarize yourself with other people’s arguments, such as the nature of gender-binary thinking in trans* issues, but you can’t understand the exact damage that has been done to trans* people unless you are yourself a trans* person. Reading about these issues does not in anyway qualify you as an expert on trans* issues, and it’s important that you acknowledge that a trans* person’s experience is more valid than your interpretation of their experience. 
  • It is not shameful to admit your privilege. A lot of people treat their privilege as a source of shame when in fact it is an important tool to harness when dealing with interrelating perspectives. Accepting and understanding your privilege allows you to discover new things about culture that you’ve never thought about before.
  • Don’t get defensive. People will find flaws in your theories, especially when discussing issues that you are not personally affected by. It’s important to see criticism as constructive, not destructive. If a disabled person points out an error in your writing or speech about disability, you should be attentive and listen to their input. Don’t argue with them and defend your previous stance, just modify your stance in order to enhance it. Plus, it’s not the end of the world to admit that you were wrong. 
  • Saying something is “just your opinion” doesn’t make your statement above scrutiny or free from judgments. Your opinion can be wrong and it is subject to criticism if it reflects thinking patterns that are harmful to others. Throwing the tag “In my opinion” on the front of a statement, such as “In my opinion, there is no such thing as racism,” does not change the foundation of the statement. You are still saying “there is no such thing as racism,” and that is not a correct or factually supported argument. Your opinion is still wrong. 
11.05.11 ♥ 23
video

there-was-a-girl:

Nafeesa performs a short short version of White.

10.16.11 ♥ 40

An Open Letter from Black Women to the SlutWalk

fuckyeahfeminists:

**note** there has been a response from Slutwalk Toronto and NYC. Check out the latest at the link.

Link The Letter and Comment on Facebook
  

We the undersigned women of African descent and anti-violence advocates, activists, scholars, organizational and spiritual leaders wish to address the SlutWalk. First, we commend the organizers on their bold and vast mobilization to end the shaming and blaming of sexual assault victims for violence committed against them by other members of society. We are proud to be living in this moment in time where girls and boys have the opportunity to witness the acts of extraordinary women resisting oppression and challenging the myths that feed rape culture everywhere. 


The police officer’s comments in Toronto that ignited the organizing of the first SlutWalk and served to trivialize, omit and dismiss women’s continuous experiences of sexual exploitation, assault, and oppression are an attack upon our collective spirits.  Whether the dismissal of rape and other violations of a woman’s body be driven by her mode of dress, line of work, level of intoxication, her class, and in cases of Black and brown bodies—her race,  we are in full agreement that no one deserves to be raped.

 

The Issue At Hand

We are deeply concerned. As Black women and girls we find no space in SlutWalk, no space for participation and to unequivocally denounce rape and sexual assault as we have experienced it.  We are perplexed by the use of the term “slut” and by any implication that this word, much like the word “Ho” or the “N” word should be re-appropriated. The way in which we are perceived and what happens to us before, during and after sexual assault crosses the boundaries of our mode of dress.  Much of this is tied to our particular history.  In the United States, where slavery constructed Black female sexualities, Jim Crow kidnappings, rape and lynchings, gender misrepresentations, and more recently, where the Black female immigrant struggle combine, “slut” has different associations for Black women.  We do not recognize ourselves nor do we see our lived experiences reflected within SlutWalk and especially not in its brand and its label. 


As Black women, we do not have the privilege or the space to call ourselves “slut” without validating the already historically entrenched ideology and recurring messages about what and who the Black woman is.  We don’t have the privilege to play on destructive representations burned in our collective minds, on our bodies and souls for generations.  Although we understand the valid impetus behind the use of the word “slut” as language to frame and brand an anti-rape movement, we are gravely concerned.  For us the trivialization of rape and the absence of justice are viciously intertwined with narratives of sexual surveillance, legal access and availability to our personhood.  It is tied to institutionalized ideology about our bodies as sexualized objects of property, as spectacles of sexuality and deviant sexual desire. It is tied to notions about our clothed or unclothed bodies as unable to be raped whether on the auction block, in the fields or on living room television screens. The perception and wholesale acceptance of speculations about what the Black woman wants, what she needs and what she deserves has truly, long crossed the boundaries of her mode of dress.   

 

We know the SlutWalk is a call to action and we have heard you.  Yet we struggle with the decision to answer this call by joining with or supporting something that even in name exemplifies the ways in which mainstream women’s movements have repeatedly excluded Black women even in spaces where our participation is most critical. We are still struggling with the how, why and when and ask at what impasse should the SlutWalk have included substantial representation of Black women in the building and branding of this U.S. based movement to challenge rape culture? 


  

Black women have worked tirelessly since the 19th century colored women’s clubs to rid society of the sexist/racist vernacular of slut, jezebel, hottentot, mammy, mule, sapphire; to build our sense of selves and redefine what women who look like us represent. Although we vehemently support a woman’s right to wear whatever she wants anytime, anywhere, within the context of a “SlutWalk” we don’t have the privilege to walk through the streets of New York City, Detroit, D.C., Atlanta, Chicago, Miami, L.A. etc., either half-naked or fully clothed self-identifying as “sluts” and think that this will make women safer in our communities an hour later, a month later, or a year later.  Moreover, we are careful not to set a precedent for our young girls by giving them the message that we can self-identify as “sluts” when we’re still working to annihilate the word “ho”, which deriving from the word “hooker” or “whore”, as in “Jezebel whore” was meant to dehumanize.  Lastly, we do not want to encourage our young men, our Black fathers, sons and brothers to reinforce Black women’s identities as “sluts” by normalizing the term on t-shirts, buttons, flyers and pamphlets. 


  

The personal is political. For us, the problem of trivialized rape and the absence of justice are intertwined with race, gender, sexuality, poverty, immigration and community.  As Black women in America, we are careful not to forget this or we may compromise more than we are able to recover.  Even if only in name, we cannot afford to label ourselves, to claim identity, to chant dehumanizing rhetoric against ourselves in any movement.  We can learn from successful movements like the Civil Rights movement, from Women’s Suffrage, the Black Nationalist and Black Feminist movements that we can make change without resorting to the taking-back of words that were never ours to begin with, but in fact heaved upon us in a process of dehumanization and devaluation. 


  

What We Ask 

Sisters from Toronto, rape and sexual assault is a radical weapon of oppression and we are in full agreement that it requires radical people and radical strategies to counter it.  In that spirit, and because there is so much work to be done and great potential to do it together, we ask that the SlutWalk be even more radical and break from what has historically been the erasure of Black women and their particular needs, their struggles as well as their potential and contributions to feminist movements and all other movements.


  

Women in the United States are racially and ethnically diverse.  Every tactic to gain civil and human rights must not only consult and consider women of color, but it must equally center all our experiences and our communities in the construction, launching, delivery and sustainment of that movement.


  

We ask that SlutWalk take critical steps to become cognizant of the histories of people of color and engage women of color in ways that respect culture, language and context.    

 

We ask that SlutWalk consider engaging in a re-branding and re-labeling process and believe that given the current popularity of the Walk, its thousands of followers will not abandon the movement simply because it has changed its label.


  

We ask that the organizers participating in the SlutWalk take further action to end the trivialization of rape at every level of society.  Take action to end the use of the word “rape” as if it were a metaphor and also take action to end the use of language invented to perpetuate racist/sexist structures and intended to dehumanize and devalue. 


  

Lastly, in the spirit of building a revolutionary movement to end sexual assault, end rape myths and end rape culture, we ask that SlutWalk move forward in true authenticity and solidarity to organize beyond the marches and demonstrations as SlutWalk. Develop a more critical, a more strategic and sustainable plan for bringing women together to demand countries, communities, families and individuals uphold each others human right to bodily integrity and collectively speak a resounding NO to violence against women.


  

To that end, we would welcome a meeting with the organizers of SlutWalk to discuss the intrinsic potential in its global reach and the sheer number of followers it has energized. We’d welcome the opportunity to engage in critical conversation with the organizers of SlutWalk about strategies for remaining accountable to the thousands of women and men, marchers it left behind in Brazil, in New Delhi, South Korea and elsewhere—marchers who continue to need safety and resources, marchers who went back home to their communities and their lives. We would welcome a conversation about the work ahead and how this can be done together with groups across various boundaries, to end sexual assault beyond the marches.


As women of color standing at the intersection of race, gender, sexuality, class and more, we will continue to be relentless in the struggle to dismantle the unacceptable systems of oppression that designedly besiege our everyday lives.  We will continue to fight for the development of policies and initiatives that prioritize the primary prevention of sexual assault, respect women and individual rights, agency and freedoms and holds offenders accountable.  We will consistently demand justice whether under governmental law, at community levels, or via community strategies for those who have been assaulted; and organize to end sexual assaults of persons from all walks of life, all genders, all sexualities, all races, all ethnicity, all histories.

Signed by: The Board of Directors and Board of Advisors, Black Women’s Blueprint | Farah Tanis, Co-Founder, Executive Director, Black Women’s Blueprint | Endorsed by: Toni M. Bond Leonard, President/CEO of Black Women for Reproductive Justice (BWRJ), Chicago, Illinois | Kelli Dorsey, Executive Director, Different Avenues, Washington, D.C. | S. Mandisa Moore | The Women’s Health and Justice Initiative, New Orleans, Louisiana | Black and Proud, Baton Rouge, Louisiana | Civil Liberties and Public Policy Program at Hampshire College, Amherst, Massachusetts | Population and Development Program, Amherst, Massachusetts | Zeinab Eyega, New York, New York | Black Women’s Network, Los Angeles, California | League of Black Women, Chicago, Illinois | African American Institute on Domestic Violence, Minneapolis, Minnesota | Brooklyn Young Mother’s Collective, Brooklyn, New York | Women’s HIV Collaborative, New York, New York | National Organization of Sisters of Color Ending Sexual Assault (SCESA), Connecticut | Girls for Gender Equity, Brooklyn, New York | My Sister’s Keeper, Brooklyn, New York | The Mothers Agenda New York (the M.A.N.Y.), Brooklyn, New York | Sojourners Group For Women, Salt Lake City, Utah | Dr. Andreana Clay, Queer Black Feminist Blog, Oakland, California | Dr. Ida E. Jones, Historian, Author, The Heart of the Race Problem: The Life of Kelly Miller | Willi Coleman, Professor of Women’s History, member of the Association of Black Women Historians, Laura Rahman, Director, Broken Social Contracts, Atlanta, Georgia | Marlene McCurtis, Director, Wednesdays in Mississippi Film Project | Issa Rae, Producer, Director, Writer, Awkward Black Girl, Los Angeles, California | The Prison Birth Project| Ebony Noelle Golden, Creative Director, Betty’s Daughter Arts Collaborative & The RingShout for Reproductive Justice | Yvonne Moore, Southern California, Sexual Assault Survivor | Kola Boo, Novelist, Poet, Womanist | Jessicah A. Murrell, Spelman College C’11, Candidate for M.A. Women’s Studies | Shanika Thomas | Cathy Gillespie | Kristin Simpson, Brooklyn, New York | Mkali-Hashiki, Certified Sexological Bodyworker, Certified Sound, Voice, & Music Healing Practitioner|

Somewhat unrelated, but my views on “SlutWalk”:

As someone who outwardly identifies as a “slut” (not just a mode of dress, but as a way of life), I feel like SlutWalk has kind of lost so much momentum because of the use of the term “slut.” I accept that even though there are many people who support the cause of ending victim-blaming and slut-shaming, they feel as though “slut solidarity” doesn’t match their personal identities or perspectives. Slut-shaming and victim-blaming are problems based in more issues than just dressing like a slut or being promiscuous. The point is that women who dress conservatively and are not promiscuous still get raped and assault, and blamed for their rape/assault. Where is their march? While I appreciate the sentiment, and find the goal of getting acceptance for sluthood a great cause, I don’t find the term “SlutWalk” appropriate for the topic of the event. It limits the scope of dialogue and does not adequately address the issue at hand.

10.01.11 ♥ 98
But it is the female commentators who make me want to spit nails. Mary Carillo and occasional commentator and tennis legend Chris Evert are the worst of them all. Mary Carillo vacillates between loving Serena—now, anyway—and criticizing her. In the early part of their careers, the sisters winning game was attributed to their powerful bodies. But they were frequently accused of “lacking strategy,” “not thinking about their shots,” and “relying on their ‘natural athleticism.” Whey they started coming to the net and winning, their success was attributed yet again to their “natural athletic ability.” The Williams Sisters were represented as hypermasculine, unattractive women overpowering dainty white female tennis players (although Jennifer Capriati, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin are anything but dainty.) These narratives about Black bodies as “naturally athletic,” “more powerful,” “more wild,” “less thoughtful,” and “less strategic” and black female bodies as “(un)naturally strong, invulnerable, and unattractive”– are central to Western narratives of white racial superiority.

Crunk Feminist Collective Refereeing Serena: Racism, Anger, and U.S. (Women’s) Tennis

A great article that sheds light on how the institution of pro-sports (in this case, pro-tennis) reflects the racist, sexist views of society. Gender and race are extremely important things to take note of when it comes to sports.

What really strikes a cord with me with this article is not only that whenever people of color do exceptionally well in sports, its almost always written off as some magical, voo-doo natual athleticism - as oppose to strategy or anything above mere “primitive, raw strength.” [and can we just let it be known that there is no scientific proof that I hear that attributes race to sheer athletic ability. No, black people don’t have extra bones or muscles…]

But in addition, lets look at how black women are demeaned in these areas. Hypermasculine & unattractive? Because we don’t fall in line with white perceptions of femininity that demand dainty-ness and fragility? Black women just don’t even have a right to femininity - lets just liken the Williams sisters to angry black men and call it a day.

(via newwavefeminism)

I think that America needs an honest discourse with itself. This is the greatest country in the world… by default. You know what I mean? But we could actually be the greatest country that ever existed, if we were just honest about who we are and what we are and where we want to go, if we learned to have that discourse. Things like racism are institutionalized, they’re systemic. You might not know any bigots, you feel like, “Well, I don’t hate black people, so I’m not a racist.” But you benefit from racism, just by the merit of the color of your skin; there’s opportunities that you have, you’re privileged in ways that you may not even realize, because you haven’t been deprived in certain ways. We need to talk about these things in order for them to change.

Dave Chappelle, on how he deals with people that think he “crosses lines that he shouldn’t be crossing” (via lasso)

I don’t gel with America number 1 stuff but everything he said is real on point.

(via strugglingtobeheard

)

Preach!!

(via theangryblackwoman)

I think it’s really interesting that our comedians in this country are basically the only people we can trust when it comes to honest politics and analysis of racial issues.

Dave Chappelle is amazing.

(via byallflowers)